Book Review: Max

Title: Max

Author: Sarah Cohen – Scali28231016

Max is a fetus inside a blonde and blue-eyed German mother. His father is also German and influential figure in the German army. However, there was no love between them, they served to one purpose only – to conceive a child in a Nazi program “Lebensborn” (Fountains of Youth). The purpose of the program was, to conceived as many purebred Aryan children who will become the future leaders of the Third Reich.

Already as a fetus, Max is aware of this and he’s not attached to his parents at all – he thinks that Germany is his mother and Hitler his father. Since his conception, he wants to become a concept of the Aryan race and he’s successful in this – he’s a first child born in a Lebensborn program and later he’s always an example to other children.

His unconditional trust in Reich begins to crumble when he become friend with Lukas – blue-eyed and blond Polish boy, who must hide he’s a Jew. Max starts asking questions and he’s beliefs begin to crumble.


I was attached to the story from beginning because of certain real historical facts and narrator of the story. I didn’t know much about Lebensborn program and I was drawn in this book because of this subject immediately.

Another thing which fascinated me was the narrator in this book. The story is told from Max’s point of view and he’s only a fetus in his mother’s abdomen when a story begins. And… how can somebody so small and who’s barely a fetus, can be so wicked already? However, in some strange way, I actually sympathized with him and felt sorry for him despite the fact he clearly showed signs of malice and that he was obviously brain-washed even before he was born!

Max is a perfect product of Lebensborn program (even before his birth). Even when he was still in a womb he was planning to become the best and one of those who will, in the future, help Hitler with his projects and their realization. I felt sad but in the same way it was somehow funny, reading about that kind of thoughts from an unborn child. And after his birth, Max was relieved because he was true Aryan not only by heart but he also looked like one. Blonde, blue-eyed, beautiful complexion and physically fitted all the measurements that were performed in the program. And precisely because of his physical qualities and deeply sympathizing with Nazism, Max is the one, who, from an early age helps in Reich.

If I was shocked at times, reading about all malicious thoughts that Max has as a fetus, I was even more shocked later, when he was a child participating in different actions. It’s hard to read about a child who enjoys in cruelty and is proud of himself and the things he’s doing, despite the fact, that innocent people are dying because of him.

Therefore, I was actually amazed by his immediate attachment to Lukas. Max has noticed Lukas because of his appearance but I was surprised that their friendship lasted even later when Max found out who Lukas really is. Nevertheless, Max still needed a lot of time to begin doubting in his Nazi beliefs and  realizing that many things they’re doing are wrong. In a way this is logical – you can’t change your beliefs and ideas over night especially not about something that you believed in it even before you were born.

Although, I found their relationship unusual and it didn’t convince me like it should. I didn’t understand why they are so attached to each other and what dragged them together. Their friendship made me confused.

I would definitely recommend this book to readers who want to read more about the history, about a Lebensborn program but they are not interested to read nonfiction. You still can learn a lot by reading this book.

Max is a book, which is, despite its difficult topic, written in a humorous way and it can be a quick read. Certainly, the most interesting part of this book is, that it’s written from a perspective of a little Nazi fanatic which fascinated me the most.

Rating: 4/5 stars

If you read this book, please, share your thoughts with me in comments! Or, if you have any other similar book recommendations.

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